Johnny [Life & Code]

Semper Exploro!

Archive for the ‘Tech’ Category

Thinkpad X230 & Ubuntu 12.10

with 2 comments

Trackpad:

  • No easy tool to control touchpad.

Using xinput

jony@Icarus:~/bin$ xinput
⎡ Virtual core pointer id=2 [master pointer (3)]
⎜ ↳ Virtual core XTEST pointer id=4 [slave pointer (2)]
⎜ ↳ TPPS/2 IBM TrackPoint id=13 [slave pointer (2)]
⎜ ↳ SynPS/2 Synaptics TouchPad id=11 [slave pointer (2)]
⎣ Virtual core keyboard id=3 [master keyboard (2)]
↳ Virtual core XTEST keyboard id=5 [slave keyboard (3)]
↳ Power Button id=6 [slave keyboard (3)]
↳ Video Bus id=7 [slave keyboard (3)]
↳ Sleep Button id=8 [slave keyboard (3)]
↳ Integrated Camera id=9 [slave keyboard (3)]
↳ AT Translated Set 2 keyboard id=10 [slave keyboard (3)]
↳ ThinkPad Extra Buttons id=12 [slave keyboard (3)]

To switch off trackpad : xinput set-prop 11 “Device Enabled” 0

To switch on trackpad : xinput set-prop 11 “Device Enabled” 1

  • How to control the sensitivity of trackpoint?

Audio Issues:

  • Internal speakers doesn’t work. Fixed with the new kernel (3.5.0-18-generic) update.
  • Mute button light is inconsistent. Sometime it comes up sometimes it doesn’t

Laptop Mode

Written by Johnny

November 10, 2012 at 9:10 am

Posted in CODE, Tech

Tagged with ,

Sublime Text syntax definition for Google Protocol Buffers

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Sublime Text  Syntax definition for Google Protocol Buffers.

Not robust – But its a start.

{ “name”: “ProtoBuf”,
“scopeName”: “source.proto”,
“fileTypes”: ["proto"],
“foldingStartMarker”: “{“,
“foldingStopMarker”: “}”,
“patterns”: [
{ “match”: “\\s+[0-9]*”,
“name”: “constant.numeric.proto”,
“comment”: “Field numbers”
},
{ “match”: “double|float|int32|int64|uint32|uint64|sint32|sint64|long|fixed32|fixed64|sfixed|sfixed64|bool|string|bytes”,
“name”: “storage.type.source.proto”,
“comment”: “Scalar Value types.”
},
{ “match”: “optional|required|repeated|default”,
“name”: “storage.modifier.source.proto”,
“comment”: “Field Rules”
},
{ “match”: “^message|^package|^option|^import|^extend|^service”,
“name”: “entity.name.function.proto”,
“comment”: “Message section”
},
{ “match”: “\/\/.*”,
“name”: “comment.line.double-slash.proto”,
“comment”: “Comments”
}
],
“uuid”: “f6a112ba-072a-47b3-b3e3-7714156b3614″
}

Update : Moved to emacs. But still still two-timing …

Update : Moved to emacs.

Written by Johnny

June 8, 2012 at 1:11 pm

Posted in CODE, Tech

End of a book : Johnny in Novell

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Last day in Novell.

Started out as an intern in the GNOME team about 5 years back. Jumped between Evolution and iFolder a few times for different (voluntary/involuntary) reasons. Met a lot of good engineers. Had both good / bad times. Learned a lot work / non-work.

Gnomers,

I loved working on Evolution, Evolution MAPI (may not be perfect, but had a awesome time with it And i’m yet to cash in on the few beers i’ve been offered), Attachment Reminder (Trivial, but looks like you guys liked/hated/loved it), Redesign of Evolution search bar and so on. Best bug that I’ve worked on so far was changing a ‘1’ to ‘-1′ in EText (Oh those early days! Had no clue what GDB can do.. Used hundreds of ‘printf’s, lots of coffee and tested the patience of office night guards and that adrenalin rush!). Thanks to Novell for the opportunity to contribute full-time and getting paid for that.

Special thanks to my mentor Srini. I’m looking forward for more new awesome fun things in GNOME.

Thanks.

I’ll miss the 1-1 coffee breaks talking games/gadgets/music, discussions on research papers that I don’t have a clue about, conversations during ‘tea breaks’ outside office (you would see me very inspired/productive after those sessions), thursday nights ;-) & nice friends that I found beyond ‘work’.

The End.

Written by Johnny

March 4, 2011 at 12:00 pm

Push Email for GNOME Evolution’s Exchange MAPI provider (exchange 2007)

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After few days of crazy bug hunting (and creating the same) , we have a nice push event notification framework for Evolution-MAPI. When Evolution is running all the changes happening in user’s mailbox in server would immediately be synced. This avoids those long fetches from server.  A short screen cast (watch in HD) :
Currently I’ve got “new mail” event handled and is limited to mailer. Would be working on other events. This feature has some major issues to be solved before it can land in master.
It is FUN !

 

Written by Johnny

November 24, 2009 at 7:28 pm

ACL Reconstruction recovery journal

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Tore my ACL while playing badminton. An awesome jump, delivered a smash at a impressive angle. On landing I slipped twisting my ankle and entire weight of my body fell on the right knee. After 15 minutes I was walking out of the club with the idea of a 10k ride (cycle) back home. Probably I was high on adrenaline/endorphins. But as soon as walked 20 meters, I couldn’t take another step.

Friends helped me out. Few days later a MRI confirmed the ACL tear. Sought opinions from 3 surgeons. A day later I was scheduled for ACL Reconstruction.

Day 0 : Wheeled into surgery. Got shots of anaesthesia in my spine. 5 minutes into the procedure I started feeling my knee again. Then some new shots to my neck and i’m out for next 4 hours. Woke up in recovery room. Crying with pain in my thigh and knee.

Day 1 : High fever. Unable to move my leg. Felt like a dead log.

Day 2 : Realised that morphine (a better refined form .. Fentanyl ?) is being pumped in to me 24 hours.

Day 3: Fever continues. Unable to therapy. But was on CPM.

Day 5 : First time moved around 10 meters (felt like 5 km) to physio rehab. Was able to walk holding support ramps. Did some weight excercises. Morale boost.

Day 6 : Fever started fading.

Day 7 : Discharged from hospital. Realized I lost so much muscle mass. Right leg is very lean.

Day 8 : Woke up at brother’s place. Good food. Ate like a hungry pig.

Day 11 : Regained some strength in the thighs. Able to move around confidently with support.

Day 16 : Moved back to my own place.

Day 17 : Afraid to bend my knee. Looks like I’m resisting to bend the knee.

Day 18 : Able to sit with around 90 degree bend in my knee. Noticed some muscle development.

Day 19 : 90 Degrees knee bending :D

Day 21 : Mental battle is tougher than actually bending the knee.

Day 22 : Walking without support (crutches). Yay!

Able to handle stairs without support.

Day 25 : 95 – 100 Degrees. Moving to Squat exercises.

Started riding on a stationary bike. Able to walk  small distance with little limp.

Day 31 : 115 Degrees. Knee feels stronger.

Day NN : Recovery still continuing. Yet to build muscles. And regain those remaining degrees. But I’m confident now that i would be back to 110% in few months (yeah .. months!).

I should confess that I’m not a very fit athlete. I’m just a ordinary clumsy guy who started playing a bit. So this is my recovery timeline. Rehab is the tough part. Painful and needs a good amount of will power to keep doing it. It is going to take a long time to get back to my running (hopefully a marathon!). Can’t wait to get back on my bike (cycle).

One thing I kept remembering was this “Pain is temporary. Quitting lasts forever” (Lance Armstrong). In this case it is literally true.

Notes :

  • Do research. Learn about the injury and the procedure before you go in. Helps a lot. Realize that you have options on the graft being used.
  • Ice is the best pain management you got. I personally don’t like pain killers.
  • Most of the online materials on this subject give times lines for fit athletes. So don’t get discouraged if you are not. Keep at it.
  • Mail from nice people at Bangalore Bikers Club

Misc :

  • Fun when you are on a stretcher and pushed around. Profound :)
  • Scary part was not the surgery, but the catheter in my arm. Got over it after a day.
  • Enjoyed the royal treatment. People always around you. don’t have to do anything. Everything is there as soon as you think about it!
  • I was without a laptop for about 15 days.
  • Long phone calls from stoned friends. ;-)
(Would try to add more information and keep this post updated ..)

Written by Johnny

November 8, 2009 at 6:13 am

Me.

with 3 comments

Johnny Jacob

Written by Johnny

July 20, 2009 at 6:13 pm

Posted in CODE, LIFE, Tech, Thoughts

GDB Scripting : A short article for a internal magazine

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I wrote a small article for a internal magazine and few of my friends wanted me to post it to this blog.

This is for people who are new to GDB and still exploring itz features. So if you’ve used GDB for more than few weeks please ignore and skip :)

GDB – Scripting

A good majority of novice programmers tend to use printf functions to trace function calls and to printout the debug data. This forces you to change the code and compile again and again. To eliminate these superfluous tasks from your day-to-day work, use GDB. The GDB has facilities for scripting and helps in saving plenty of your time.

Tracing Function Calls

If you want to know whether a function is called or not, create a break point and write a simple script.

<code>

#Set the breakpoint

(gdb) b mapi_sync

Breakpoint 1 at 0x7fffd75f36e2: file camel-mapi-folder.c, line 741

#Tell GDB what to do when the breakpoint is reached

(gdb) commands

Type commands for when breakpoint 1 is hit, one per line.

End with a line saying just “end”.

> continue

> end

(gdb)

</code>

continue – Come out of break and continue

end – terminate command list

Run the program now. The GDB prints the function name when the breakpoint is hit and automatically continues running the program.

Breakpoint 1, mapi_sync (folder=0xc9c1a0, expunge=0, ex=0xf3a0c0) at camel-mapi-folder.c:741

741             CamelMapiStore *mapi_store = CAMEL_MAPI_STORE (folder->parent_store);

Using the GDB Scripts for Analyzing the Data

Suppose that you have a singly-linked list that has strings in it. At some point, you might want to know the contents of the list. To do this, use the GDB scripting instead of adding the debug statements in your code.

<code>

#Example for gslist traversal.

define p_gslist_str

set $list = ($arg0)

while ((GSList *)$list->next != 0)

p (char *)(GSList *)$list->data

set $list = (GSList *)$list->next

end

end

document p_gslist_str

p_gslist_str <list>: Dumps the strings in a GSList

end

</code>

Add the above snippet into a file and load it into the GDB as follows:

<code>

(gdb) source /home/jjohnny/scripts/gdb/gslist.gdb

</code>

Now, anywhere you want to take a look in the GSList, simply break and

<code>

(gdb) p_gslist_str server_uid_list

$17 = 0x7fffd81101b0 “7666BC1E000000015870BD1E00000001″

$18 = 0x7fffd810e330 “7666BC1E000000015970BD1E00000001″

$19 = 0x7fffd810cbe0 “7666BC1E000000015C70BD1E00000001″

</code>

Simple scripts thus can save you a lot of time from adding or removing the debugging statements from your code. Now go ahead and create a suite of scripts to aid the library you are writing.

More cool developer tricks later. Have fun !

— End —

Thanks to Radhika for editing the article.

Btw when is Archer branch  (Python scripting) getting into GDB ? I’ve been using it a bit .

GDB

- Scripting

A good majority of novice programmers tend to use printf functions to trace function calls and to printout the debug data. This forces you to change the code and compile again and again. To eliminate these superfluous tasks from your day-to-day work, use GDB, the GNU Project Debugger. The GDB has facilities for scripting and helps in saving plenty of your time.
Tracing Function Calls
If you want to know whether a function is called or not, create a break point and write a simple script.
<code>
#Set the breakpoint
(gdb) b mapi_sync
Breakpoint 1 at 0x7fffd75f36e2: file camel-mapi-folder.c, line 741
#Tell GDB what to do when the breakpoint is reached
(gdb) commands
Type commands for when breakpoint 1 is hit, one per line.
End with a line saying just “end”.
> continue
> end
(gdb)
</code>
continue – Come out of break and continue
end – terminate command list
Run the program now. The GDB prints the function name when the breakpoint is hit and automatically continues running the program.
Breakpoint 1, mapi_sync (folder=0xc9c1a0, expunge=0, ex=0xf3a0c0) at camel-mapi-folder.c:741
741             CamelMapiStore *mapi_store = CAMEL_MAPI_STORE (folder->parent_store);
Using the GDB Scripts for Analyzing the Data
Suppose that you have a singly-linked list that has strings in it. At some point, you might want to know the contents of the list. To do this, use the GDB scripting instead of adding the debug statements in your code to print out the data.
</code>
#Example for gslist traversal.
define p_gslist_str
set $list = ($arg0)
while ((GSList *)$list->next != 0)
p (char *)(GSList *)$list->data
set $list = (GSList *)$list->next
end
end
document p_gslist_str
p_gslist_str <list>: Dumps the strings in a GSList
end
</code>
Add the above snippet into a file and load it into the GDB as follows:
<code>
(gdb) source /home/jjohnny/scripts/gdb/gslist.gdb
</code>
Now, anywhere you want to take a look in the GSList, simply break
<code>
(gdb) p_gslist_str server_uid_list
$17 = 0x7fffd81101b0 “7666BC1E000000015870BD1E00000001″
$18 = 0x7fffd810e330 “7666BC1E000000015970BD1E00000001″
$19 = 0x7fffd810cbe0 “7666BC1E000000015C70BD1E00000001″
</code>
Simple scripts thus can save you a lot of time from adding or removing the debugging statements from your code.
Now go ahead and create a suite of scripts to aid the library you are writing.
More cool developer tricks later. Have fun !

Written by Johnny

July 7, 2009 at 8:56 am

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